ASHA Learning Pass

Filter Courses By
Experience [clear]
Instructional Level
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.5
Summary: First, Julie Case and Maria Grigos provide a review of speech motor control literature in childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) and give clinical implications to the assessment and treatment of CAS. Second, Kristen Allison reviews approaches to measuring speech intelligibility in children with motor speech disorders. Third, Tricia McCabe, Donna Thomas, and Elizabeth Murray describe Rapid Syllable Transition Treatment (ReST) as a treatment for CAS. Fourth, Nancy Tarshis, Michelle Winner, and Pamela Crooke explore how communication challenges in CAS impact social competency and how speech motor challenges impact social development. Finally, Nina Benway and Jonathan Preston evaluate if features of CAS in the literature could be replicated in a sample of school-age children. Readers will describe how speech motor skills have been found to change with practice in CAS, list the linguistic factors that can influence intelligibility, describe the quality of the research that supports ReST, explain ways to consider social cognition in therapy for CAS, and rank the speech features that distinguish the narrow phonetic transcriptions of children with CAS and speech sound disorders.
Credit(s): PDHs: 7.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.7
Summary: First, Katie Strong and Barbara Shadden provide an overview of the relationship between narrative, identity, and social co-construction for persons with aphasia and narrative treatment approaches for identity renegotiation. Second, Jamie Azios and Jack Damico relate the Lifetime Participation Approach to Aphasia (LPAA) and issues in longterm care (LTC) along with practice recommendations for implementing LPAA in LTC. Third, Jerry Hoepner and Tom Sather examine the potential approaches for teaching and mentoring students in LPAA. Fourth, Rochelle Cohen-Schneider, Melodie Chan, Denise McCall, Allison Tedesco, and Ann Abramson explore balancing relationshipcentered care and professionalism. Finally, Sarah Wallace, Elena Donoso Brown, Anna Saylor, Erica Lapp, and Joanna Eskander describe aphasia-friendly modifications for occupational therapy assessments and home programs.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.3
Summary: These Perspectives (SIG 2) articles focus on approaches for early identification, service delivery, and treatment of traumatic brain injury (TBI). In the first article, Juliet Haarbauer-Drupa and Michael Brink describe the existing literature on preschool children with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and illustrate a model of care for a community. Next, Lori Cook, Nellie Caulkins, and Sandra Chapman explore the potential for cognitive training delivered via telepractice to enhance cognitive performance after mild TBI in adolescence. Lastly, Mary Kennedy offers an update on the evidence the provides possible explanations for speech-language pathologists’ experiences while implementing a coaching approach with college students with TBI.