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Presenter(s): Kendrea L. (Focht) Garand, PhD, CScD, CCC-SLP, BCS-S, CBIS
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.25
Summary: A thorough cranial nerve examination is an essential part of the speech-language pathologist’s evaluation of every patient. When performed, it is useful in the diagnosis of speech and swallowing disorders, and accurate diagnosis is crucial for development of a targeted, individualized treatment plan. This video course provides an overview of the neuroanatomy and physiology of the cranial nerve examination. Participants will receive detailed instructions for testing and interpreting findings of the cranial nerve examination. The course also describes common abnormalities observed for patients with impairment of cranial nerve function.
Presenter(s): Margaret Lehman Blake, PhD, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: Two deficits commonly caused by damage to the right hemisphere are unilateral neglect and anosognosia. Unilateral neglect is reduced attention to one region of space, and anosognosia is reduced awareness of deficits. These deficits commonly co-occur and have an impact on how well a patient participates in and responds to treatment. This webinar will discuss characteristics, assessment, and treatment of both disorders.
Presenter(s): Kirrie Ballard, PhD, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: Acquired apraxia of speech (AOS) typically occurs alongside aphasia. Clinicians are often challenged with questions such as, “What should I work on first, and why/how?” and “How can I deliver intensive therapy in today’s healthcare system?” While there are a number of treatment approaches available for AOS, there are very few large-scale investigations of treatment efficacy to inform practice and limited studies that tackle the issues around intensity and concomitant disorders. This course summarizes the pros, cons, and similarities of impairment-based approaches to treatment for individuals with AOS plus aphasia.
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