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Credit(s): PDHs: 3.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.3
Summary: These Perspectives (SIG 6) articles focus on diagnostic tools and considerations for management of several challenging patient populations in audiology. The first article discusses utilizing magnetic resonance imaging to determine the functional and structural neural alterations associated with chronic tinnitus. Researchers are utilizing advanced imaging techniques to study variability in perceptual characteristics and reaction to tinnitus. The second article discusses the continuum of disorders known as “cortical hearing impairment,” supported by a comprehensive summary of clinical presentations. Despite its rarity, an audiologist must understand etiologies of cortical hearing impairment and know how to evaluate and characterize the accompanied hearing difficulty. The third article examines the effects of concussion of the vestibular system and presented an assessment battery for athletes postconcussion and for determining return to play.
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.15
Summary: These Perspectives (SIG 8) articles cover a wide range of audiology and public health topics. Konrad-Martin and colleagues promote effective and standardized coding and third payer billing practices for the audiological management of symptomatic ototoxicity. The article includes relevant ICD-10-CM codes and CPT codes. Myers and Dundas provide a review of the effects of noise on the vestibular system. They note that temporary and permanent effects of noise on the vestibular system have been reported and advocate for further investigations to unpack the complex relationship between the auditory and vestibular systems. Finally, Pletnikova and colleagues conducted a quality initiative project to determine the feasibility and reliability of a tablet-based portable audiometer to identify hearing loss in a cognitively impaired population.
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: These Perspectives (SIG 6) articles describe current research, diagnostic, and management techniques for three different vestibular populations, including individuals with Usher Syndrome, Meniere’s Disease, and aging populations. The first article examines age-related changes in vestibular function and discusses findings in animal studies examining specific structural and functional changes occurring within the system. The second article is a review designed to advance understanding of the clinical presentation of individuals with Usher Syndrome and discuss the importance of a multi-disciplinary team in diagnosis and management. Additionally, the latest research in gene-therapy treatments for Usher Syndrome are discussed. The final article is a large scale retrospective study of patients with an active Meniere’s Disease diagnosis. The study examines correlations between disease duration and diagnostic assessment findings.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.5
Summary: For people experiencing dizziness, what are possible options for vestibular and balance rehabilitation? This self-study from Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups (SIG 7) addresses treatment choices in vestibular and balance rehabilitation, the state of the evidence on their efficacy, and future directions for interdisciplinary research and practice. Written by clinicians and scholars with expertise in audiology and physical therapy, the four articles present an interdisciplinary and life span approach to vestibular and balance rehabilitation for children and adults. The first article by Christy is on the use of vestibular and balance rehabilitation therapy for dizziness in children. Next, the review by Herdman focuses on the evolution of vestibular function tests and rehabilitation for major vestibular disorders as well as areas in which research and clinical practice may grow in the future. In Holmberg, the relatively new but common diagnosis of persistent postural-perceptual dizziness (PPPD) is presented in terms of its pathophysiology, differential diagnosis, and treatment protocols. Finally, Clendaniel provides a review on the use of vestibular rehabilitation in the treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Included are detailed photos and illustrations of current techniques and exercises. As described in the introduction to the forum by Guest Editor Neil Shepard, PhD, “It is hoped that these four articles will provide a needed look at vestibular and balance rehabilitation therapy (VBRT) so the audiologist can serve as a productive member of the treatment team and have a good understanding as to everything that