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Credit(s): PDHs: 3.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.35
Summary: These four SIG 13 articles provide information for dysphagia practice. They address a unique array of special populations and challenges in patient care involving swallowing and feeding difficulties.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.35
Summary: The theme for this SIG 14 activity is self-reported confidence and knowledge between multilingual and monolingual speech-language pathologists in working with culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) individuals and assessment considerations when working with individuals who speak a language other than English. Topics include (a) examining differences between self-reported confidence and knowledge in multilingual and monolingual speech language pathologists; (b) nonword repetition in assessment; and (c) sound sequencing characteristics in words of children who speak German.
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.25
Summary: In an ever-changing global landscape, it is pertinent that audiologists and speech-language pathologists “account for the complexity and diversity of healthcare contexts” (as stated in the second article by Pillay and Pillay). Pressing concerns related to advancing technology (artificial intelligence and machine learning), culturally responsive practice, and rapid climate change are all trending societal conversations. This SIG 17 self-study explores creative solutions to pressing global issues that impact the field of audiology and speech-language pathology. Topics presented include key ethical concerns regarding hearing aids with machine learning, a novel culturally responsive framework for contextualized clinical reasoning, and the impact of climate change on communication and swallowing disorders.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.4
Summary: The first article in this SIG 18 activity investigates the applications speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and audiologists used most frequently during the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. It also discusses the main obstacles to providing speech, language, and hearing services through telepractice. Through the international distribution of an electronic survey, a total of 1,466 surveys from SLPs and audiologists from 40 countries were used for the analysis. The second article discusses the Auditory Verbal UK's training program for prospective listening and spoken language specialist certified auditory verbal therapists delivered globally via telepractice. The article explores, from a global perspective, audiology and early intervention services and perspectives regarding telepractice. The third article explores parents' and therapists' views of the benefits and challenges of telepractice for early intervention for children who are deaf or hard of hearing during the COVID-19 pandemic. Through survey and analysis, the article probes the views of parents, Listening and Spoken Language Specialist Certified Auditory Verbal Therapists in using telepractice to deliver auditory verbal sessions.
Presenter(s): Anthony DiLollo, PhD, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: Many clients need help adjusting to their communication challenge and/or coping with the changes required to help them communicate more effectively. This on demand webinar examines counseling in the context of speech-language pathology practice and shares skills and behaviors SLPs can use to effectively engage in counseling with all types of clients.
Presenter(s): Dunay L Schmulian, AuD, PhD
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: Professional fatigue and self-care are critical issues for audiologists and speech-language pathologists. Without attention and intervention, professional fatigue can negatively impact a professional’s home life, relationships, personal well-being, work life, and/or ability to deliver person-centered care. This course explores the concepts of empathy, emotional contagion, compassion fatigue, vicarious traumatization, and burnout as they relate to the professions and offers tips to avoid and address these challenges.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.35
Summary: This SIG 5 activity analyzes the relationship between the opioid crisis and cleft lip and palate care across the life span. Two main themes of prevention and treatment after exposure are explained. The articles outline alternatives to opioid use after cleft-related surgeries, impacts on infants and children who were exposed in utero, and velopharyngeal insufficiency treatment after substance abuse.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.35
Summary: These SIG 12 Perspectives articles provide information on current issues associated with visual processing of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) displays for people with traumatic brain injury, assessment of the expressive language abilities of Spanish-speaking children who rely on AAC, and culturally sensitive approaches to aided language modeling. Readers will be more adept at designing effective AAC displays for adults with traumatic brain injury and at providing AAC services to children from multilingual and multicultural backgrounds.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.3
Summary: The theme for this SIG 14 activity is clinical considerations through paradigm shifts in providing culturally relevant family-centered intervention and instruction. Topics include (a) providing culturally relevant family centered care; (b) second language literacy instruction for multilingual adolescents; and (c) impacts of study abroad experiences on students’ intercultural competence.
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.25
Summary: In “Coupling Hearing Health With Community-Based Group Therapy for Cognitive Health in Low-Income African American Elders,” Postman et al. describe a community-based group intervention to address disparities experienced by African American elders in the early stages of cognitive–communicative decline. The intervention included partnerships with community health centers, culturally informed activities, and ongoing input from staff and participants. The authors describe the advantages of this community-engaged approach, as well as the benefits of joining hearing and cognition for minimizing access barriers. In “Public Health Frameworks in Audiology Education: Rationale and Model for Implementation,” Warren and Levy review how public health education can advance the field of audiology, particularly through coursework and dual degree programs. The authors also describe two frameworks for public health training in an audiology academic setting and identify the competencies that overlap in audiology and public health, helping to illustrate the relevance of public health education in addressing objectives in hearing health care.
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