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Presenter(s): Corey Herd Cassidy, PhD, CCC-SLP; Cynthia Core, PhD, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: This webinar explores the nature and typical development of speech sound production in children under age 3 with and without language delays or disorders. The speakers discuss best practices for assessment of speech abilities in young children as well as family-centered strategies to facilitate speech sound development within everyday activities and routines in early intervention.
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.25
Summary: These Perspectives (SIG 13) include a variety of topics in dysphagia across the age continuum and across the many settings that speech-language pathologists (SLPs) address dysphagia. Parker Huston, Robert Dempster, and Lauren Garbacz provide readers with an overview of common evidence-based psychological techniques used in the treatment of adolescents with feeding disorders, including motivational interviewing and cognitive behavioral techniques. The goal of this paper is to provide a high-level overview of these concepts so that providers outside of psychology may utilize some of these techniques in therapy, when referral to a behavioral specialist or psychologist is not feasible. Next, authors Lauren Madhoun and Robert Dempster discuss the psychosocial aspects of feeding in the neonatal intensive care unit NICU and immediately following NICU discharge. Joanne Patterson extends the discussion to the adult population by describing a biopsychosocial intervention that combines cognitive behavioral with dysphagia therapy, termed Cognitive-Behavioral Enhanced Swallowing Therapy (CB-EST) and its application in managing head and neck cancer patients with dysphagia. Finally, authors Kortney Eng, Maria Jose Flores, Elisabeth Gerrity, Nupur Sinha, Katherine Imbeau, Laddie Erbele, and Cary Yeh share details from their study investigating the effect of high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) on swallow physiology in healthy adults. We hope these articles will be of significant value to practicing clinicians and to students learning about dysphagia.
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: These Perspectives (SIG 13) articles present clinicians with useful information to help assess and treat feeding and swallowing disorders in a variety of patient populations across the lifespan. Daniel Croake and Vrushali Angadi provide an overview of evidence regarding prophylactic and reactive gastrostomy tubes in individuals with head and neck cancer, to better facilitate joint decision-making of percutaneous gastrostomy (PEG) tube timing with the patient and care team. Hema Desai and Audrey Lim extend the discussion to pediatric dysphagia by summarizing the application of neurobehavioral interventions as part of feeding treatment for infants with congenital heart defects.
Presenter(s): Catherine Cronin Carotta, EdD, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: This session introduces a model for implementing early childhood education and assessment practices for children who are deaf or hard of hearing. The presenter uses classroom and home-based video samples to demonstrate how adapting the physical learning environment, addressing the emotional climate, selecting learning formats, and using language facilitation techniques can benefit all children. This course is a recorded session from the 2019 online conference “Birth to Three: Working Together to Serve Children and Their Families.”
Presenter(s): Toby Long, PhD, PT, FAPTA
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: Part C (Early Intervention) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) emphasizes a team-based model and provides for professional development programs to develop the skills and knowledge of service providers. This session describes the process used to identify and develop effective team-based, interprofessional competencies and discusses their use in practice, with the goal of enhancing outcomes for young children and their families. The session discusses common and discipline-specific competencies and identifies challenges to and solutions for incorporating the competencies into practice. This course is a recorded session from the 2019 online conference “Birth to Three: Working Together to Serve Children and Their Families.”
Presenter(s): MaryAnn Romski, PhD, CCC-SLP; Rose A. Sevcik, PhD
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: This session provides an overview of myths – widely held but false beliefs – that have hampered the use of AAC in early intervention services (e.g., that a child must be a certain age to benefit from AAC, or that AAC hinders or stops speech development). The presenters provide evidence to refute these common myths and discuss strategies for how to debunk them. This course is a recorded session from the 2019 online conference “Birth to Three: Working Together to Serve Children and Their Families.”
Presenter(s): Maia Braden, MS, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: Cleft lip and/or palate is the most common birth anomaly, affecting 1 in 700 live births, but SLPs who work in early intervention often report limited training and comfort with this population. This session provides an overview of cleft conditions from birth to 3 years. The speaker discusses feeding challenges and interventions, surgical timeline, and speech and language development and interventions for infants and toddlers with cleft lip and/or palate. This course is a recorded session from the 2019 online conference “Birth to Three: Working Together to Serve Children and Their Families.”
Presenter(s): Mary Louise Peters, MEd, MS
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: Transitioning out of early intervention services can be confusing for families and professionals who support them; the process is often fraught with misconceptions about requirements, entrenched practices, and emotional reactions. This session discusses the regulations related to transitioning out of IDEA Part C services and identifies evidence-based, family-centered, and responsive practices that can help SLPs effectively collaborate with young children, their families, and other professionals for smooth and successful transitions. This course is a recorded session from the 2019 online conference “Birth to Three: Working Together to Serve Children and Their Families.”
Presenter(s): Memorie M. Gosa, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-S
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.15
Summary: Feeding and swallowing skills evolve during the first 3 years of life. This session explores the resources needed for effective identification and management of feeding and swallowing disorders in toddlers. This course is a recorded session from the 2019 online conference “Birth to Three: Working Together to Serve Children and Their Families.”
Presenter(s): Rhea Paul, PhD, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.15
Summary: Toddlers with a range of communication disorders can be minimally verbal past the age at which children typically begin speaking. This session describes an integrated approach using AAC and interventions that target vocalizations to increase expressive language and speech production in young children who are minimally verbal or nonverbal. This course is a recorded session from the 2019 online conference “Birth to Three: Working Together to Serve Children and Their Families.” It appeared in the conference with the title Working With Preverbal Infants and Toddlers Toward Early Speech.
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