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Results 1 - 10 of 30
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.5
Summary: This activity is a grouping of studies related to the understanding stuttering throughout the life span. The activity is based on articles related to attentional focus on motor control in people who stutter (PWS) and the relationship to social stress, acoustic measures of emotion in children who stutter, a study of covert stuttering throughout the lifespan, vocational stereotyping of PWS by human resource preprofessionals, and audio-based podcasts to assist in self-help for PWS. Together, these articles investigate important measures in understanding stuttering and how researchers and clinicians can better understand the condition of stuttering.
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: These SIG 2 articles focus on clinical assessment and practices for individuals with aphasia. Topics covered included challenges associated with diagnosing primary progressive aphasia (PPA) and the impact of adaptive yoga programs for persons with aphasia. First, Aimee Dietz, E. Susan Duncan, Lauren Bislick, Sarah Stegman, Jenna Collins, Chitrali Mamlekar, Rachel Gleason, and Michael J. McCarthy provide an overview of the potential impact adapted yoga programs can have for people with stroke-induced aphasia. Second, Adithya Chandregowda raises awareness about the challenges associated with encountering primary progressive aphasia (PPA) patients in the acute hospital setting.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.4
Summary: This collection of articles presents information currently relevant to caring for patients. Firstly, Cara Donohue and James L. Coyle, and Christina Kang and David Lott, share service delivery focusing on the diagnoses of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and muscle tension dysphagia, respectively. Samantha Shune and Ashwini Namasivayam provide systematic strategies to better support patients’ informal caregivers. Rinki Varindani Desai and Ashwini Namasivayam-MacDonald describe the practice patterns of speech-language pathologists managing dysphagia in persons with dementia. Lastly, Nancy Swigert and Ashley Wright describe effectiveness and efficiency as the key components of a value-based health-care system.
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.15
Summary: These articles explore thickened liquids for oropharyngeal dysphagia, importance of patient selection, & balancing physical welfare/quality of life (QOL); QOL in patients/caregivers in recovery for swallowing disorders; audiologist knowledge of cognitive impairment/screening in outcomes/communication; and hearing screening for individuals who are diagnosed with dementia.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.5
Summary: For people experiencing dizziness, what are possible options for vestibular and balance rehabilitation? This self-study from Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups (SIG 7) addresses treatment choices in vestibular and balance rehabilitation, the state of the evidence on their efficacy, and future directions for interdisciplinary research and practice. Written by clinicians and scholars with expertise in audiology and physical therapy, the four articles present an interdisciplinary and life span approach to vestibular and balance rehabilitation for children and adults. The first article by Christy is on the use of vestibular and balance rehabilitation therapy for dizziness in children. Next, the review by Herdman focuses on the evolution of vestibular function tests and rehabilitation for major vestibular disorders as well as areas in which research and clinical practice may grow in the future. In Holmberg, the relatively new but common diagnosis of persistent postural-perceptual dizziness (PPPD) is presented in terms of its pathophysiology, differential diagnosis, and treatment protocols. Finally, Clendaniel provides a review on the use of vestibular rehabilitation in the treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Included are detailed photos and illustrations of current techniques and exercises. As described in the introduction to the forum by Guest Editor Neil Shepard, PhD, “It is hoped that these four articles will provide a needed look at vestibular and balance rehabilitation therapy (VBRT) so the audiologist can serve as a productive member of the treatment team and have a good understanding as to everything that
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.25
Summary: This collection of articles presents clinicians with information on some of the most timesensitive topics in dysphagia care of utmost relevance, particularly in the current COVID- 19 pandemic. Firstly, Liza Blumenfeld, Lisa Evangelista, Maggie Kuhn, Kristen Linnemeyer, Nogah Nativ-Zeltzer, and Heather Starmer provide best practice recommendations on the management of patients with head and neck cancers from the speech-language pathology perspective amid COVID-19. Authors Hema Desia and Jennifer Raminick then provide recommendations for safer feeding of infants on high flow oxygen therapy due to acute respiratory failure. Lastly, authors Grainne Brady and Justin Roe, Kellyn Hall and Leslie Johnson, and Annette Askren and Marnie Kershner discuss different aspects of clinician–patient collaborated dysphagia care delivery models and their impact on successful outcomes.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.45
Summary: These Perspectives (SIG 10) articles explore several issues related to student success. Sylvan, Brock, Perkins, and Garret examine prerequisites required by graduate programs in speech-language pathology across the United States. Roitsch, Murphy, and Raymer investigate the relationship between executive functions and academic outcomes in speech-language pathology graduate students. Richardson, Roberts, and Victor explore ways to predict the clinical success of graduate students studying speechlanguage pathology. Look, Shoemaker, Hoepner, and Blake discover benefits of engaging undergraduate students in research.
Credit(s): PDHs: 7.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.7
Summary: First, Katie Strong and Barbara Shadden provide an overview of the relationship between narrative, identity, and social co-construction for persons with aphasia and narrative treatment approaches for identity renegotiation. Second, Jamie Azios and Jack Damico relate the Lifetime Participation Approach to Aphasia (LPAA) and issues in longterm care (LTC) along with practice recommendations for implementing LPAA in LTC. Third, Jerry Hoepner and Tom Sather examine the potential approaches for teaching and mentoring students in LPAA. Fourth, Rochelle Cohen-Schneider, Melodie Chan, Denise McCall, Allison Tedesco, and Ann Abramson explore balancing relationshipcentered care and professionalism. Finally, Sarah Wallace, Elena Donoso Brown, Anna Saylor, Erica Lapp, and Joanna Eskander describe aphasia-friendly modifications for occupational therapy assessments and home programs.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.35
Summary: In these Perspectives (SIG 4) articles, two of the articles relate to patterns of disfluency in young bilingual children—one of these two articles adds the patterns of stuttering in young bilingual children that stutter. The third article uses a thematic analysis to help understand why adults who stutter attended self-help groups.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.3
Summary: These Perspectives (SIG 2) articles focus on approaches for early identification, service delivery, and treatment of traumatic brain injury (TBI). In the first article, Juliet Haarbauer-Drupa and Michael Brink describe the existing literature on preschool children with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and illustrate a model of care for a community. Next, Lori Cook, Nellie Caulkins, and Sandra Chapman explore the potential for cognitive training delivered via telepractice to enhance cognitive performance after mild TBI in adolescence. Lastly, Mary Kennedy offers an update on the evidence the provides possible explanations for speech-language pathologists’ experiences while implementing a coaching approach with college students with TBI.
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