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Presenter(s): Mary Elliott; Andrea D Warner-Czyz; Rachel E. Glade; Nannette Nicholson
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: This course focuses on social-emotional learning milestones and current trends in research regarding social-emotional learning for children who are deaf or hard of hearing relative to peers with typical hearing. A research team reports on findings from a survey of caregivers of children with hearing loss regarding their knowledge, ratings, and facilitation of social-emotional learning in their children.
Presenter(s): Steven Thomas Kulsar
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: This session focuses on the use of in-situ measures and development of patient amplification prescriptions. The importance of in-situ measures is widely overlooked or misunderstood. Dissecting the benefits of this and other built-in manufacturer software features will provide opportunity for significant improvement in fitting outcomes and patient satisfaction over conventional first-fit settings. Proper implementation and use of these features should decrease time and effort in fitting and counseling, and decrease the need for repeat visits for re-programming.
Presenter(s): Ishan S Bhatt; Nilesh Washnik
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: Young musicians are exposed to traumatic sound levels that might increase their risk for tinnitus and noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). Music and noise are known environmental risk factors for tinnitus and NIHL. This course examines a hypothesis that genetic variants might further explain clinical heterogeneity in tinnitus and NIHL.
Presenter(s): Shae D Morgan; Sarah Crow; Andrea D Warner-Czyz
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: This course presents a study that examined the effect of auditory status on emotion recognition and the link between emotion recognition to social well-being in adolescents who are deaf or hard of hearing (DHH) or typical hearing (TH).
Presenter(s): Rachel K Sievers, AuD, CCC-A
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: This webinar explores challenges school professionals face regarding Hearing Assistive Technology (HAT), discusses preferred practices for determining HAT eligibility, and shares practical guides to use in your work setting. The speaker addresses common questions like: "How can I ensure that this HAT is appropriate for this student?" "How can I ensure that the equipment is working each day?" "How can I get buy-in from school partners regarding the equipment's day-to-day use?"
Presenter(s): Harvey B Abrams, PhD; James W Hall, PhD
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: This course includes two presentations that introduce strategies and tools for remote hearing assessment, including online and smartphone tests of hearing, remote pure tone audiometry, speech audiometry, and evaluation of peripheral and central auditory dysfunction in pediatric and adult populations. The course is part of a set of practical programs that address specific aspects of remote practice in audiology.
Presenter(s): Tommy Evans, AuD, CCC-A
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: This course demonstrates how Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center is using telehealth applications to address the needs of children with hearing loss during the COVID-19 pandemic and into the future, including remote hearing aid evaluations, fittings, programming, repairs, and functional benefit assessments. The course is one in a set of practical programs that address specific aspects of remote practice in audiology.
Presenter(s): Gayla L. Poling, PhD, CCC-A
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: Hundreds of medications commonly prescribed for anticancer treatments and some infections are known to cause auditory and/or vestibular dysfunction, known as ototoxicity. This course discusses early detection of ototoxicity through increased awareness, leveraging current tools, and clinical practice approaches for serial monitoring, all of which can provide care teams opportunities to identify adverse effects, modify treatment plans to mitigate hearing loss, and utilize individualized interventions. The speaker discusses strategies for preventing or minimizing cochlear damage to preserve quality of life for patients receiving treatment and to reduce the societal burden of hearing loss.
Presenter(s): Dr. O’neil W. Guthrie, MS, PhD, CCC-A
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: Gene therapy offers the promise to correct inherited forms of hearing loss as well as acquired forms such as noise-induced hearing loss, ototoxicity, and presbycusis. However, there are several barriers that must be overcome before such potential can be realized. This course describes the conceptual framework that governs gene therapy today, reveals how this framework has influenced current progress, and discusses a re-imagining of inner ear gene therapy with the goal of achieving outcomes that are clinically relevant and realistic.
Presenter(s): Vickie L. Tuten, AuD, CCC-A, CPS/A; Kathy E. Gates, AuD, CCC-A
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: Noise is prevalent in everyday life, and the general population lacks awareness of the risks of hazardous noise exposure and strategies to reduce noise-induced hearing loss. By integrating hearing loss prevention education into patient encounters and taking advantage of outreach/education opportunities, audiologists can help reduce the prevalence of noise-induced hearing loss. This course discusses the why, where, and how of integrating prevention education into your practice.
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