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Presenter(s): Cynthia J. Cress, PhD, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.15
Summary: Learning to gesture or use aided AAC for intentional communication with a partner is challenging for some infants and toddlers with complex communication needs. This session explores a variety of intervention strategies that improve pre-intentional and intentional communication skills using various AAC modalities and some of which incorporate families and caregivers. The speaker shares live illustrations and video examples of young children who have various difficulties with pre-intentional communication and problem solves about how intervention can structure the learner’s experiences to fill in gaps. This course is a recorded session from the 2021 online conference “Expanding AAC: Accessible Strategies for Functional Communication.”
Presenter(s): Vicki Clarke, MS, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: This session examine the often-daunting process of moving a child who is minimally verbal or nonverbal from a basic to a full-featured AAC system. The session covers the selection, use, and goal-setting process for a basic, functional communication and language development system while planning for assessment for and implementation of a fuller system. The speaker shares suggestions for designing effective intervention sessions and ideas for helping the team get on board. This course is a recorded session from the 2021 online conference “Expanding AAC: Accessible Strategies for Functional Communication.”
Presenter(s): Lesley E. Mayne, PhD, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: This on demand webinar presents an organizational framework for planning AAC intervention that maximizes communication for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The course presents strategies to support children with ASD and their communication partners, including clinicians, parents, and teachers. The speaker defines the “mask of attention” for children with ASD; discusses factors that contribute to the challenge of looking behind this mask to increase communication; and demonstrates how to plan and organize a goal-driven AAC intervention session.
Presenter(s): MaryAnn Romski, PhD, CCC-SLP; Rose A. Sevcik, PhD
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: This session provides an overview of myths – widely held but false beliefs – that have hampered the use of AAC in early intervention services (e.g., that a child must be a certain age to benefit from AAC, or that AAC hinders or stops speech development). The presenters provide evidence to refute these common myths and discuss strategies for how to debunk them. This course is a recorded session from the 2019 online conference “Birth to Three: Working Together to Serve Children and Their Families.”
Presenter(s): Rhea Paul, PhD, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.15
Summary: Toddlers with a range of communication disorders can be minimally verbal past the age at which children typically begin speaking. This session describes an integrated approach using AAC and interventions that target vocalizations to increase expressive language and speech production in young children who are minimally verbal or nonverbal. This course is a recorded session from the 2019 online conference “Birth to Three: Working Together to Serve Children and Their Families.” It appeared in the conference with the title Working With Preverbal Infants and Toddlers Toward Early Speech.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.3
Summary: These Perspectives (SIG 2) articles review and present current issues related to augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) across different patient populations, as well as identifies and discusses team-based interprofessional practice approaches for managing individuals with complex communication needs within both pediatric and adult populations. In the first article, Shannon Taylor, Sarah Jane Wallace, and Sarah Elizabeth Wallace explore factors that influence successful use of high-technology AAC in persons with poststroke aphasia via a literature review and narrative synthesis methodology. Lori Marra and Katie Micco present a clinical focus article that assesses communication partner’s perception regarding the effectiveness of a training model to support AAC use within a parent–adolescent communication pair. Michelle Westley, Dean Sutherland, and H. Timothy Bunnell examine the experience of healthy voice donors during the ModelTalker voice banking process for New Zealand-accent synthesized voices. Sarah Diehl and Michael de Reisthal describe the complex symptoms associated with Huntington’s disease and how they influence implementation of AAC to address the communication needs of this population. Kristen Abbott-Anderson, Hsinhuei Sheen Chiou, and Brooke N. Burk address interprofessional practice via a multidisciplinary patient-centered engagement experience entitled Spring EngAGEment that serves individuals living with Alzheimer’s disease or other associated dementias. Finally, Laura Hinkes Molinaro, and Wendy Stellpflug discuss a team approach for education and support of patients and families with postoperative pediatric cerebellar mutism syndrome.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.45
Summary: SLPs who work with children who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) need a broad base of knowledge in evidence-based assessment, system designs, and implementation practices, particularly as technological innovations in AAC proliferate. This journal self-study explores of all of the above. The first article provides a useful framework for assessment that distinguishes essential components according to the child’s motor and cognitive abilities. Two articles examine design features: The first examines consistency of symbol location to increase efficiency, and the second looks at characteristics of naturalistic displays and their effects on gaze behavior according to clinical profiles. The final article in this self-study reviews practices for training communication partners of children who use AAC.
Presenter(s): Teresa Gray, PhD, CCC-SLP; Audrey Holland, PhD, CCC-SLP; Tim Nanof, MSW; Sarah E. Wallace, PhD, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.4
Summary: This course includes four recorded sessions from the 2018 online conference “Improving Functional Outcomes in Aphasia.” Two of these sessions address strategies for working with special populations of people with aphasia and two other sessions explore modifications to technology and coding/documentation that may need to be made when working with individuals with aphasia. The conference included a total of 15 sessions, giving a comprehensive view of the current landscape of aphasia intervention as well as related subjects, including medical management, neuroplasticity, life participation, assessment, and more. Sessions explored practical treatment strategies to meet the needs of patients across the severity spectrum and in various treatment settings, as well as the unique needs of a range of patient subgroups.
Presenter(s): Kathryn Clapsaddle, MS, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) can be life-changing for many individuals, but due to its complex and commercial nature, it also comes with a myriad of potential ethical concerns. Clinicians can improve AAC assessment and intervention outcomes for those they serve by being confident they are making ethically informed decisions about AAC use. This webinar uses case studies to discuss common ethical dilemmas encountered in the use of AAC, leaning on the ASHA Code of Ethics for support. The presenter outlines a process for ethical decision-making and shares trends in school and health care settings that affect ethical decision-making as it relates to AAC use.
Presenter(s): Nancy C. Brady, PhD, CCC-SLP; Tom Buggey, PhD; Jane Keegan Quarles, MS, CCC-SLP; Betty Yu, PhD, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.45
Summary: This course includes four recorded sessions from the 2017 online conference “Communication Interventions for Adolescents and Adults With Autism.” Taken together, these sessions give a sense of the breadth of communication challenges that adults and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder face. These sessions also explore some distinctive strategies, specifically self-modeling and AAC interventions. The conference included a total of 16 sessions, with the broad goal of giving SLPs tools to help students and clients develop or enhance friendships and strengthen work-life relationships to support their academic and workplace success.