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Results 91 - 100 of 263
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.25
Summary: This collection of articles presents clinicians with information on some of the most timesensitive topics in dysphagia care of utmost relevance, particularly in the current COVID- 19 pandemic. Firstly, Liza Blumenfeld, Lisa Evangelista, Maggie Kuhn, Kristen Linnemeyer, Nogah Nativ-Zeltzer, and Heather Starmer provide best practice recommendations on the management of patients with head and neck cancers from the speech-language pathology perspective amid COVID-19. Authors Hema Desia and Jennifer Raminick then provide recommendations for safer feeding of infants on high flow oxygen therapy due to acute respiratory failure. Lastly, authors Grainne Brady and Justin Roe, Kellyn Hall and Leslie Johnson, and Annette Askren and Marnie Kershner discuss different aspects of clinician–patient collaborated dysphagia care delivery models and their impact on successful outcomes.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.5
Summary: First, Julie Case and Maria Grigos provide a review of speech motor control literature in childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) and give clinical implications to the assessment and treatment of CAS. Second, Kristen Allison reviews approaches to measuring speech intelligibility in children with motor speech disorders. Third, Tricia McCabe, Donna Thomas, and Elizabeth Murray describe Rapid Syllable Transition Treatment (ReST) as a treatment for CAS. Fourth, Nancy Tarshis, Michelle Winner, and Pamela Crooke explore how communication challenges in CAS impact social competency and how speech motor challenges impact social development. Finally, Nina Benway and Jonathan Preston evaluate if features of CAS in the literature could be replicated in a sample of school-age children. Readers will describe how speech motor skills have been found to change with practice in CAS, list the linguistic factors that can influence intelligibility, describe the quality of the research that supports ReST, explain ways to consider social cognition in therapy for CAS, and rank the speech features that distinguish the narrow phonetic transcriptions of children with CAS and speech sound disorders.
Credit(s): PDHs: 9.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.9
Summary: This journal self-study course is composed of papers from a 2019 Research Forum, Advancing Statistical Methods in Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences. These selected articles provide advanced-level discussion about clinically relevant statistical methodologies to give speech-language pathologists a stronger foundation from which to analyze and understand the statistical research they come across to decide when and how to apply it in practice.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.45
Summary: These Perspectives (SIG 10) articles explore several issues related to student success. Sylvan, Brock, Perkins, and Garret examine prerequisites required by graduate programs in speech-language pathology across the United States. Roitsch, Murphy, and Raymer investigate the relationship between executive functions and academic outcomes in speech-language pathology graduate students. Richardson, Roberts, and Victor explore ways to predict the clinical success of graduate students studying speechlanguage pathology. Look, Shoemaker, Hoepner, and Blake discover benefits of engaging undergraduate students in research.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.35
Summary: In these Perspectives (SIG 4) articles, two of the articles relate to patterns of disfluency in young bilingual children—one of these two articles adds the patterns of stuttering in young bilingual children that stutter. The third article uses a thematic analysis to help understand why adults who stutter attended self-help groups.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.3
Summary: These Perspectives (SIG 2) articles focus on approaches for early identification, service delivery, and treatment of traumatic brain injury (TBI). In the first article, Juliet Haarbauer-Drupa and Michael Brink describe the existing literature on preschool children with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and illustrate a model of care for a community. Next, Lori Cook, Nellie Caulkins, and Sandra Chapman explore the potential for cognitive training delivered via telepractice to enhance cognitive performance after mild TBI in adolescence. Lastly, Mary Kennedy offers an update on the evidence the provides possible explanations for speech-language pathologists’ experiences while implementing a coaching approach with college students with TBI.
Presenter(s): Kendrea L. (Focht) Garand, PhD, CScD, CCC-SLP, BCS-S, CBIS, CCRE
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: This session—a recorded session from ASHA’s 2020 Health Care Connect online conference—explores the power of a comprehensive cranial nerve assessment as part of a swallow examination. The speaker discusses neuroanatomy and neurophysiology of the cranial nerves and shares a step-by-step procedure for performing a cranial nerve assessment, including identification of common abnormalities and how to document findings.
Presenter(s): Jo Puntil, MS, CCC-SLP, BCS-S
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: This session—a recorded session from ASHA’s 2020 Health Care Connect online conference—examines the SLP’s role on patient-centered care teams in the ICU setting. The speaker discusses the SLP’s vital role in facilitating communication for patients who are intubated, and participants will have the opportunity to practice communicating with various techniques in different roles. The speaker also explores when to screen/assess swallowing post-extubation and how to reduce post-intensive care syndrome (PICS). The session also addresses the importance of communication regarding patient status and goals across the continuum of care, and how to provide bundled patient-centered care using a team approach.
Presenter(s): Kate Hutcheson, PhD, CCC-SLP, BSC-S; Katherine Connelly MA, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.15
Summary: This session—a recorded session from ASHA’s 2020 Health Care Connect online conference—discusses cancer basics, treatment options, and their functional impacts as they relate to swallowing and cognitive-communication. The speakers discuss common referrals in acute care oncology settings and describe an algorithm for clinical decision-making.
Presenter(s): Catherine Turk, PhD, CCC-SLP; Christina Rappazzo, MA, CCC-SLP, BCS-S
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.15
Summary: This session—a recorded session from ASHA’s 2020 Health Care Connect online conference—provides an overview of prevalent genetic disorders with an emphasis on pediatric feeding and swallowing complications. The speakers highlight currently available research and review best practices in assessment and intervention, including the use of videofluoroscopic swallow studies to underscore common swallowing deficits.
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