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Presenter(s): Sarah Wallace, OBE, BSc, PGDip FRCSLT
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: This session discusses the vital role SLPs who work in adult ICUs play in detection and management of voice, swallowing, and airway complications following COVID-19. The speaker discusses the nature of these complications; intubation, tracheostomy, and COVID-19 features; factors to guide early treatments; and how these factors shape decision-making in post-ICU settings.
Presenter(s): Rebecca J Boersma, MA, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: This session reviews the emerging evidence of neurological manifestations of COVID-19 and identifies how SLPs can use their unique position to maximize patient outcomes-whether as a member of an interdisciplinary team or as a solo provider. The session strives to increase clinicians' confidence in their abilities to: identify common cognitive-communication symptoms for patients who have recovered from COVID-19, and evaluate and treat with an individualized, patient-centered approach.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.35
Summary: This collection of SIG 13 articles addresses popular topics in dysphagia care throughout the life span regarding thickening practices, family-centered care, and early intervention. Jane Mertz Garcia, Edgar Chambers IV, and Anna Boyer utilized a survey to re-examine practice patterns for thickened liquids and provided a comparison of past practices with current to provide insight into contemporary themes that have previously not been considered. Doreen Benson and George Barnes explore the utility of a mathematical prediction model (Bayes theorem) in dysphagia management. Samantha E. Shune, Deanna Linville, and Ashwini Namasivayam-MacDonald address maximizing treatment effectiveness by using an approach with family resiliency and adaptation. Drawing from the principles of family systems theory and the biopsychosocial-spiritual framework, they use a case study as a tutorial to explore the application of family-centered care models to dysphagia management. Stephanie C. Cohen and Karen Dilfer focus on the definition of pediatric feeding disorder (PFD) and the multifaceted needs of families and children in early intervention, support for use of responsive feeding in treatment of PFD, alignment of responsive feeding strategies with early intervention principles, and barriers limiting access to consistent, high-quality early intervention services for children with PFD.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.35
Summary: This SIG 13 collection of astute articles provides information regarding managing and treating dysphagia in the hospital for both adult and pediatric patients. Nalia GurgelJuarez and colleagues explore the frequency of oral care based on staff adherence to oral care policies. Rebecca Smith et al. investigate the quality-of-life impacts of dysphagia and its interventions on mealtimes using the Swallowing Quality of Life Questionnaire and the Eating Assessment Tool. Jessica L. Rice and Maureen A. LeftonGreif review high-flow nasal cannula mechanisms of action, its use in specific populations and settings, and what is known about initiation of feeding during this therapy. Finally, Donna Edwards and colleagues explore the impact of COVID-19 on modifications in clinical practice related to pediatric feeding disorders and dysphagia via telehealth.
Presenter(s): Ed M Bice, MEd, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: Ethics is an often-forgotten portion of evidence-based practice. Although not a distinct part of the triad, ethics play an important role in every decision. This session provides practical applications of the tenets of the ASHA Code of Ethics, with focus on the concept of competence.
Presenter(s): Kellyn Dailey Hall, PhD, CCC-SLP; Leslie W Johnson, PhD, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: This session explores how health disparities impact dysphagia management and associated outcomes. The speakers present tools and strategies SLPs can use to improve their cultural responsiveness and adopt an inclusive mindset in their approach to patient-centered care for patients with dysphagia.
Presenter(s): Kendrea Layne Garand, PhD, CScD, CCC-SLP, BCS-S, CBIS, CCRE
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.15
Summary: This session explores the strengths and limitations for interpreting clinical swallow examination (CSE) results, including implications for dysphagia management in adult populations across clinical settings. The speaker contrasts CSEs with instrumental swallow examinations and shares resources to maximize clinical usefulness of the clinical swallow exam.
Presenter(s): Rinki Varindani Desai, MS, CCC-SLP, CBIS, CDP
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: This session shares preferred practices for selecting, conducting, and interpreting instrumental swallow exams. The speaker discusses strengths and limitations of different instrumental exams, along with clinical applications to promote more accurate dysphagia diagnosis, targeted treatment planning, and positive patient outcomes. The session includes tips for critical thinking and current evidence supporting the use of instrumental exams to optimize the safety and quality of life of those living with swallowing disorders.
Presenter(s): Gintas Krisciunas, MPH, MA; Susan L Langmore, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-S; Renee Speyer, PhD
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: This session reviews what it means for a measure to be objective, subjective, and/or valid and applies these concepts to fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES). The presenters also discuss other, equally important, criteria to consider when evaluating a patient for dysphagia: accuracy, meaningfulness, and relevancy.
Presenter(s): Bonnie J Martin-Harris, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-S
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: This session introduces technological, procedural, and analysis factors that optimize objectivity and reproducibility of clinically valid videofluoroscopic measurements made from modified barium swallow (MBS) studies. The speaker addresses the importance and preferred practices for learning, training, and measurement skill calibration and demonstrates positive and negative influences of clinical bias on VFSS measurement and interpretation.
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