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Credit(s): PDHs: 4.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.45
Summary: People with Parkinson’s disease (PD) often present with dysarthria and reduced intelligibility. Understanding the nature of these speech deficits and how they affect the individual will improve treatment and speech outcomes. This journal self-study explores how aspects of both the individual (such as native language and experiences with speaking) and treatment conditions (such as task or cue types) affect speech production and intelligibility for people with PD. SLPs can use this information to improve intervention for people with PD and individual perceptions of speech production.
Presenter(s): Don MacLennan, MA, CCC-SLP; McKay Moore Sohlberg, PhD, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.4
Summary: This course presents a practical framework for cognitive rehabilitation for patients suffering from a traumatic brain injury (TBI). Clinicians can use the framework to identify functional treatments that are evidence-based, matched to individualized patient needs, and feasible given the time and resource constraints of the current health care environment. The course explores specific cognitive rehabilitation interventions that patients with a brain injury may find particularly valuable and motivating. The presenters use case studies to discuss how to write functional goals and identify optimum outcome measures.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.35
Summary: The articles included in this journal self-study include evidence-based assessment and intervention practices for children with cleft lip and/or palate, a specialized population with which many SLPs have limited experience. The first article describes a clinical measure for quantifying nasal air emission using a nasal accelerometer. The second article illustrates the developmental timeline of typical velopharyngeal function in speech production and then compares it to what is seen in toddlers with repaired cleft. The third article offers treatment efficacy data for a naturalistic intervention with phonological emphasis for toddlers with cleft lip and/or palate. The final article examines a number of factors that can influence language development in internationally adopted children with cleft lip and/or palate.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.45
Summary: This journal self-study explores a variety of issues related to adult vocal health and how voice disorders affect social and work-related interactions. Articles examine prevalence rates of voice disorders among college students; self-reports of vocal use; issues that school workers confront that may affect vocal health; the impact of common workplace issues, such as heating and air conditioning levels, on vocal functioning; and how voice disorders may affect listener processing and comprehension.
Presenter(s): Ann W. Kummer, PhD, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: A history of cleft palate is the most common cause of velopharyngeal dysfunction (VPD), but there are many other causes, including other structural anomalies of the velopharyngeal valve, neurophysiological disorders that result in inadequate velopharyngeal movement, and even faulty placement of the articulators due to mislearning. Differential diagnosis of the cause of these VPD speech characteristics and the contributing factors is essential to determine appropriate treatment, whether it be velopharyngeal surgery, a prosthetic device, and/or intervention with an SLP. In this webinar, the presenter will show videos and discuss various causes of abnormal resonance and nasal emission due to non-cleft velopharyngeal dysfunction. The presenter will also discuss a variety of treatment options that are appropriate for various causes of VPD.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.35
Summary: As people age, they often experience a variety of health-related issues, including hearing loss and memory difficulties. This journal self-study explores the relationship between hearing loss and cognitive functioning and considers what is known about age-related cognitive decline and how it may be influenced by hearing loss and the use of amplification. As the primary provider of hearing-related services for older adults, audiologists are in a position to address cognitive issues and assist patients and families. This journal course discusses strategies on how to do so effectively.
Presenter(s): Barbara D. Weinrich, PhD, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.3
Summary: Childhood and adolescent voice disorders are observed in multiple clinical settings, with many professionals having limited background or education to properly treat them. Pediatric voice disorders can have adverse effects on children and teens in classroom and social situations. This video course provides a plethora of practical information based on research and practice in a major pediatric hospital setting. Vocal hygiene, vocal function exercises, semi-occluded vocal tract exercises, and other specific techniques are discussed.
Presenter(s): Kendrea L. (Focht) Garand, PhD, CScD, CCC-SLP, BCS-S, CBIS
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.25
Summary: A thorough cranial nerve examination is an essential part of the speech-language pathologist’s evaluation of every patient. When performed, it is useful in the diagnosis of speech and swallowing disorders, and accurate diagnosis is crucial for development of a targeted, individualized treatment plan. This video course provides an overview of the neuroanatomy and physiology of the cranial nerve examination. Participants will receive detailed instructions for testing and interpreting findings of the cranial nerve examination. The course also describes common abnormalities observed for patients with impairment of cranial nerve function.
Presenter(s): Michelle S. Bourgeois, PhD, CCC-SLP; Becky Khayum, MS, CCC-SLP; Darby Morhardt, PhD, LCSW; Yvonne Rogalski, PhD, CCC-SLP; Amy Rominger, AuD, CCC-A
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.3
Summary: This course includes three recorded sessions from the 2016 online conference "Maximizing Functional Outcomes for Patients With Dementia." These sessions focus on working with all the stakeholders involved in treating patients with dementia – the individual, family members and other caregivers, and all the health care professionals involved in the person’s care. Sessions discuss caregiver counseling and support, helping patients with hearing loss, and a specific model for interdisciplinary care. The conference included a total of 13 sessions, with the broad goal of describing a range of evidence-based clinical care techniques to get to the heart of patient-centered dementia care.
Presenter(s): Ken Brummel-Smith, MD; Valarie B. Fleming, PhD, CCC-SLP; Becky Khayum, MS, CCC-SLP; Emily Rogalski, PhD
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.5
Summary: This course includes four recorded sessions from the 2016 online conference "Maximizing Functional Outcomes for Patients With Dementia." These sessions focus on identification and management of individuals with primary progressive aphasia, Alzheimer’s disease, other major types of dementia, and mild cognitive impairment. The conference included a total of 13 sessions, with the broad goal of describing a range of evidence-based clinical care techniques to get to the heart of patient-centered dementia care.
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