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Results 181 - 190 of 721
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.35
Summary: In this SIG 4 activity, authors describe ways to (a) increase speech-language pathologists’ comfort with treating stuttering by providing a structured grouping of activities centered around using education, ease, and empowerment (Gore & Margulis); (b) continue using empirical evidence and clinical experience to make informed decisions about assessment procedures for young children who stutter (Singer & Kelly); and (c) provide holistic speech-language therapy services for stuttering using telehealth (McGill & Schroth). Each of these articles provides practicing clinicians ways to gain confidence in their abilities to provide evaluations and treatment across delivery paradigms.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.55
Summary: In this SIG 4 activity, authors explore ways to provide experiential learning to graduate students enrolled in stuttering courses (Palasik, Hughes, & Ellis) and discuss the clinical experiences of school-based speech-language pathologists related to stuttering (Panico, Daniels, Yarzebinski, & Hughes), strategies for teachers to support children who stutter (Cozart & Wilson), and ways to interrupt the narrative of ableism that surrounds the treatment of stuttering (Gerlach-Houck & Constantino). Each of these articles provides a unique perspective on ways that professionals can seek to create a more supportive environment for our clients who stutter by changing the foundations of the way we teach preservice clinicians, support our school-based colleagues, and address the narrative of ableism that pervades our culture.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.35
Summary: In this SIG 4 activity, authors detail the myriad of ways that stuttering can influence aspects of life, from parents’ differing perceptions of their child who stutters (Mostafa, St. Louis, El-Adaway, Emam, & Elbarody), to completion of turns by people who do not stutter when the person who stutters experiences stuttering (Kondrashov & Tetnowski). These articles help readers understand the pervasive nature that stuttering exerts on the lives of people who stutter across the lifespan.
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: The theme for this SIG 14 activity is bilingual parents’ experiences receiving advice regarding language use and perspectives related to multicultural training with SLPs. Topics include: examining the advice parents of bilingual children received from health care professionals and teachers regarding the language(s) their children should learn and use, as well as assessing whether SLPs feel adequately prepared to interact with, assess, instruct, or treat multicultural clients.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.45
Summary: This SIG 2 activity, participants explore aspects of service delivery and advocacy for people with aphasia that are innovative and/or unique. The first article describes the creation of community aphasia groups and includes guidance for creating aphasia-friendly materials for a variety of purposes. The second article describes the challenges of people with aphasia in navigating the justice system and discusses strategies to support their success within that unique environment. The third article describes the nature of verbal short-term memory impairment in people with aphasia, methods of assessment, and potential directions for treatment.
Presenter(s): Theresa M Harp, MA, CCC-SLP, LSLS Cert. AVT
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: This session examines ways to collaborate with parents to maximize child outcomes while following research-based coaching guidelines. The speaker reviews tools such as Loom, GoogleDocs, Jamboard, and Pinterest. Participants will gain a better understanding of the importance of parent collaboration as well as specific ideas of fun, innovative ways to connect with parents.
Presenter(s): Ian Sadler, PhD
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: This course describes the various ways that a head and neck cancer diagnosis can impact mental health, and ways to identify when a patient may need to seek professional help from a mental health specialist. The speaker highlights how a speech-language pathologist can assist in the detection of a potential mental health disorder through use of mental health screenings and head-and-neck-specific quality-of-life measures, and discusses considerations for addressing mental health and effectively navigating challenges that may impede success during treatment and/or rehabilitation.
Presenter(s): Anna Vagin, PhD; Maryellen R Moreau, MEd, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: This course explores an effective technique for building complex narrative language and thought. By "pressing pause," SLPs and students can take time to talk about and connect "thoughts" (mental states) to elements of story grammar such as initiating events, feelings, and plans. This process is integral for discovering intentions and motivations, perspective-taking, thinking critically, solving problems, and participating in social situations. Speakers also discuss a powerful way to teach "inference" using film "jump cuts."
Presenter(s): Huanhuan Shi, MS; Meredith Kincaide; Christina Reuterskiold, PhD, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: This course focuses on a meaning-based approach to language assessment and intervention for intentional communication skills in young children. The nonlinguistic and linguistic context support meaning-driven communication expressed with language form from the child. Speakers discuss language sample analysis and the developmental hierarchy of Language Content/Form/Use, and highlight how this approach is less biased than norm-based assessments when used with children from culturally and linguistically diverse contexts.
Presenter(s): Stephanie DeAnda, PhD, CCC-SLP; Matthew Hall, PhD; Naomi Caselli, PhD
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: This session highlights recent advances in understanding language acquisition in children who are deaf/hard of hearing (DHH), with an emphasis on the acquisition of sign languages (either on their own or alongside spoken languages). Speakers present advances in measurement, by introducing three new tools that are available for clinical use: the D-LEAT, the LAPT, and the ASL-CDI 2.0.
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