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Presenter(s): Teresa L Farnham, MA, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: When assessing and analyzing the speech sound mastery of preschool and early elementary-age children with highly unintelligible speech, it can be challenging to measure baseline and progress in an unbiased, meaningful manner. This session discusses how to start a child moving quickly toward intelligibility by using simple and effective assessment practices, while also easing the workload for periodic progress monitoring.This course is a recorded session from the 2022/2023 online conference "Assessment, Eligibility, and Dismissal in Schools: Strategies, Tools, and Decision-Making."
Presenter(s): Barry M Prizant, PhD, CCC-SLP; Alexandria Zachos, MS, CCC-SLP; Margery L Blanc, MA, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: This on-demand dialog features SLPs Marge Blanc, Barry Prizant, and Alexandria Zachos, who discuss a language-based approach to managing echolalia. The discussion is a follow-up to the webinars "A Language-Based Approach to Managing Echolalia" and "From Echolalia to Self-Generated Language: Case Studies in Natural Language Acquisition."
Presenter(s): Julie A G Stierwalt, PhD, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: Principles of motor learning (PML) are guidelines developed for the purpose of training motor execution of movement. Initially designed for training in the limbs, the methods have been adapted for use with the oral motor system. This course reviews how PML can be employed in training protocols targeting speech production.
Presenter(s): Rene L Utianski, PhD, CCC-SLP, BC-ANCDS; Kristie A Spencer, PhD, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: Motor speech disorders occur secondary to a wide variety of progressive neurological disorders. This course discusses strategies for the speaker, listener, and environment that clinicians can consider for managing progressive motor speech disorders. Presenters discuss management strategies in the context of concomitant decline of cognitive-linguistic and motoric function from neurodegenerative processes.
Presenter(s): Maja Katusic, MD; Kelly Brytowski, MA, CCC-SLP; Becky S Baas, MA, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: This course explores the common journeys children with motor speech disorders and their families undertake when seeking diagnosis and treatment. The speakers discuss the medical workup, the role of expert SLPs, and the partnerships among the medical and educational teams serving children.
Presenter(s): Jennifer Gray, MS, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: Down syndrome is a genetic syndrome characterized by unique anatomical and physiological traits; medical complications affecting movement, respiration, feeding, and metabolism; intellectual disabilities; as well as dysarthria and other communication challenges. This on demand webinar shares evidence-based techniques that target motor speech, voice, fluency, and functional language to maximize intelligibility and comprehensibility of speech and language for individuals with Down syndrome.
Presenter(s): Megan Leece, MA, CCC-SLP; Jonathan L. Preston, PhD, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: This recorded dialog features SLPs Megan Leece and Jonathan Preston, who discuss practical, evidence-based intervention approaches for persisting /r/ distortions, common speech sound errors for many children and adolescents.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.45
Summary: This SIG 2 activity, participants explore aspects of service delivery and advocacy for people with aphasia that are innovative and/or unique. The first article describes the creation of community aphasia groups and includes guidance for creating aphasia-friendly materials for a variety of purposes. The second article describes the challenges of people with aphasia in navigating the justice system and discusses strategies to support their success within that unique environment. The third article describes the nature of verbal short-term memory impairment in people with aphasia, methods of assessment, and potential directions for treatment.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.35
Summary: This SIG 19 activity bundles four articles providing perspectives on a broad variety of topics in speech-language pathology. First, Holt provides an overview of current and historical discussions of gender and race, challenging the reader to accept that one’s perspective is indebted to a specific belief system. Readers are to evaluate how gender and race are used to categorize people and examine whether a member of a marginalized or minoritized group affects that person’s access to or use of intervention services. Next, Cox and Koenig define speech privacy and provide a brief history and applications in the health care setting. A general perspective is outlined, including threats to speech privacy, and speakers who use an electrolarynx are used as an example to highlight specific issues clinicians may encounter. Ramanarayanan et al. discuss the use of speech as a biomarker in therapy and research. In summary, robustness of analytics—specificity, diversity, and physiological interpretability—must be further developed. Finally, Weerathunge, Tomassi, and Stepp review a number of populations with voice disorders that have been studied using altered auditory feedback. Many have hyperactive auditory feedback responses and the differing underling reasons are reviewed. Therapy considerations are also described.
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: It is well known within our field that identifying voice and upper airway specialized training opportunities and subsequent positions is challenging, competitive, and sometimes elusive. In this SIG 3 activity, various pathways to specializing in voice and upper airway disorders are explored from the viewpoint of different authors at various stages of their careers. The hope is to make the process of specialization more transparent and share components that have contributed to success, while also highlighting the diversity of training and experience that is so important in our field.
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