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Presenter(s): Sandra Prentiss, PhD, CCC-A
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: No national or international consensus exists on the delivery of care specific to pre-operative and post-operative audiologic cochlear implant evaluation and management. As such, decision-making regarding testing methods is largely made by the professional judgement of the clinician, which can bring with it discrepancies in testing that lead to inconsistent access to cochlear implants. This session discusses these discrepancies and provides a set of guidelines clinicians can use to refer patients for a cochlear implant evaluation. The session addresses the importance of a multidisciplinary approach when evaluating candidates for cochlear implants. This course is a recorded session from the 2019 online conference “Audiology 2019: Cochlear Implants.”
Presenter(s): Jace A. Wolfe, PhD, CCC-A
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.15
Summary: There is not much consensus or standardization in the practices professionals use to measure outcomes for cochlear implant (CI) recipients. This session examines outcome measurement, providing clear and concise recommendations for assessment of outcomes in adult and pediatric CI recipients. This course is a recorded session from the 2019 online conference “Audiology 2019: Cochlear Implants.”
Presenter(s): Sarah A. Sydlowski, AuD, PhD
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: This session discusses the current parameters for identifying cochlear implant candidates and provides an update on cochlear implantation that aims to clarify misconceptions that may influence referral patterns. The speaker points out resources that clinicians can use to offer comprehensive, authoritative information on cochlear implantation candidacy to their patients. This course is a recorded session from the 2019 online conference “Audiology 2019: Cochlear Implants.”
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.4
Summary: This self-study features highly read and cited audiology research articles published in 2018 in ASHA’s scholarly journals. Topics reflect the diversity of the field and include: (1) what users need to know to effectively manage hearing aids, (2) how language skills develop in children with cochlear implants, and (3) information available on social media about tinnitus.
Credit(s): PDHs: 6.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.6
Summary: This journal self-study course compares language performance in children with and without cochlear implants from preschool to 6th grade. The articles examine levels of language from phonology to prosody, offering insights into areas of strength and weakness as well as clinical directions. The first article examines consonant acquisition patterns based on hearing exposure. The second and third articles compare morphosyntactic, lexical, and phonological awareness profiles, the effect of literacy on each language skill, and types of errors produced in school-age children with and without cochlear implants. The fourth article explores differences in word-learning strategies that could affect lexical development and offers clinical suggestions based on these findings. The final article explores children’s abilities to discriminate emotional intent based on suprasegmental characteristics in the speech signal.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.3
Summary: This journal self-study focuses on several aspects of patient care and management for practitioners who serve children who are deaf or hard of hearing. The articles, originally published in a 2014 issue of Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood, discuss the unique needs of children with mild, minimal, and/or unilateral hearing loss; the effects of fatigue on children with hearing loss; and the importance of monitoring speech-language performance and progress as well as hearing aid use in this population.
Presenter(s): Gail D. Chermak, PhD, CCC-A
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: This session will provide information to assist clinicians in making informed, evidence-based clinical decisions about CAPD assessment and intervention. For example, a considerable body of research has demonstrated the efficiency of individual central auditory tests and test batteries based on performance of individuals – including children – with confirmed CANS lesions. Similarly, there is substantial evidence that auditory training can be an effective treatment for central auditory processing deficits. This session will provide an overview of research support for existing and emerging assessment and treatment practices. This course is a recorded session from the 2018/2019 online conference “Central Auditory Processing Disorders (CAPD).”
Presenter(s): Gail J. Richard, PhD, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: Central auditory processing disorders (CAPDs) can be confusing and challenging for audiologists and speech-language pathologists alike. This session will explain the theory behind CAPDs, clarify the definition, outline some of the controversial aspects, and offer practical strategies for diagnosis and intervention. This course is a recorded session from the 2018/2019 online conference “Central Auditory Processing Disorders (CAPD).”
Presenter(s): Gail D. Chermak, PhD, CCC-A
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: The recommended practices for diagnosis and intervention for central auditory processing disorder (CAPD) are dynamic, undergoing review and refinement as new research emerges. These recommended practices have been developed by groups like the American Academy of Audiology and ASHA, with careful discussion and consideration of points of disagreement. Nonetheless, a number of controversial assertions and practice recommendations continue to appear in the literature. This session will examine a number of these issues, with a focus on highlighting the current state of the evidence supporting best clinical practices and decision-making. This course is a recorded session from the 2018/2019 online conference “Central Auditory Processing Disorders (CAPD).”
Presenter(s): Deborah Moncrieff, PhD, CCC-A; Andrew J. Vermiglio, AuD, CCC-A
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: There is not one single, authoritative construct or definition for central auditory processing disorders (CAPDs), which often results in patients receiving a general diagnosis that is not deficit-specific and management strategies that are not individualized and therefore produce less impactful outcomes. This session will describe an alternative approach to characterizing CAPDs – that is, identifying specific clinical entities within the broad construct of CAPDs that professionals can unambiguously diagnose and for which deficit-specific interventions can lead to improved outcomes in auditory processing. This course is a recorded session from the 2018/2019 online conference “Central Auditory Processing Disorders (CAPD).”
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