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Presenter(s): Sapna R. Kudchadkar, MD, PhD, FCCM; Ann Parker, MD, PhD
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: Adult and pediatric survivors of critical illness commonly experience post-intensive care syndrome (PICS, or PICS-p in children), consisting of impairments in mental health (e.g., anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms), cognition, and physical function. These impairments are associated with worse health-related quality of life and can persist for years after discharge from the intensive care unit. This session describes the incidence of and risk factors for such symptoms as well as interventions to prevent and manage these impairments.
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.25
Summary: These SIG 8 Perspectives articles focus on topics that are important in promoting public health audiology. In “Fundamentals of Epidemiology for the Audiologist,” Torre and Reavis provide an overview of basic epidemiologic concepts including study design, prevalence, incidence, risk ratios, and odds ratios. The authors emphasize that an understanding of epidemiology is crucial for audiologists for a variety of reasons, including to help them assess the quality of publications, evaluate and discuss the efficacy of screening methods, and evaluate and communicate risk factors for ear and hearing problems. In “Hearing Health Care Delivery Outside the Booth,” Gates, Hecht, Grantham, Fallon, and Martukovich review the literature on boothless audiometry and introduce current tools used to deliver hearing health care outside of the traditional clinic setting. From their review, the authors conclude that boothless audiometry technology provides an opportunity for audiologists to expand services to nontraditional settings such as waiting grooms and nursing homes, increasing access to care, early identification, and intervention, and therefore improving health outcomes.
Presenter(s): Meagan Bachmann, AuD, MHL
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: In the evolving environment of over-the-counter hearing aids, big box stores, and changing reimbursement, should audiologists charge differently for hearing aid services? This on demand webinar explores why itemizing services or providing a hybrid model of service delivery could be beneficial, how this model was implemented at one medical center, and how to determine what to bill.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.4
Summary: These SIG Special Topics articles provide guidance to current and future researchers in communication sciences and disorders about how to maximize the clinical impact of their research. Utianski et al. describe clinical practice research and the current barriers to it, while highlighting initiatives researchers can take advantage of. Douglas et al. define knowledge brokering and outline the roles of organizations and individuals who take on that job. Then, Davidson and colleagues offer researchers concrete steps for using social media to enhance impact. Finally, Nicholson and Smith review both traditional science impact metrics and alternative metrics and offer concrete recommendations for documenting clinical impact for use in one’s CV or career advancement materials.
Presenter(s): Meaghan Reed, AuD, CCC-A
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: It is unclear how over-the-counter hearing devices will impact our patients and our practices in the coming years. This session will discuss practical strategies for incorporating OTC devices, deciding when to offer alternative rehabilitation options to patients, and offering a wider variety of solutions to meet our patients’ needs.
Presenter(s): Cherilee Rutherford, AuD
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: This session will explore the Calgary-Cambridge Guides and the Four Habits framework to support audiologists in applying person-centered care and communication skills through the different phases of an audiology appointment. The session will discuss active reflection activities, person-centered principles, and practical ways to enhance hearing care.
Presenter(s): Christina M Callahan, AuD, CCC-A
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: This course explores realistic scenarios audiologists may encounter when remotely fitting hearing aids for adults. The course discusses strategies for successful hearing aid fitting via teleaudiology and identifies challenges and how to address them when they occur. The course is one in a set of practical programs that address specific aspects of remote practice in audiology.
Presenter(s): Jennifer A Drob, AuD, CCC-A
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: As bone conduction implants evolve, there are now more options available than ever before, prompting the question: How do I choose the right one for my patients? This recorded session from the ASHA Audiology 2022 Online Conference discusses the current bone conduction implants on the market, candidacy criteria, and programming considerations.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.45
Summary: In this SIG 10 activity, Farrugia explores the preparatory experiences of SLPs working in early intervention (EI) in Michigan, as a first step toward understanding how to best prepare students for practice and on-the-job learning in EI. McDaniel, Hessling Prahl, and Schuele provide a tutorial for a PhD Student–Mediated Mentorship Model (PSMMM) used within their lab. The PS-MMM teaches PhD students to be research mentors, encourages graduate clinicians to transition to research and doctoral training, and aims to increase the research experiences available to undergraduate and graduate students. Ronney and Kirby offer a critical review regarding service-learning with audiology students and their clients/patients. They describe best practice and common challenges to inform future research. Finally, Brackenbury and Kopf describe how game-based learning can facilitate student and client instruction through increased motivation and engagement, including suggestions for implementation in classroom and clinical settings.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.35
Summary: These three articles center on aspects of audiology and speech-language pathology providers in pediatric hearing loss. First, “eHealth Coaching: Counseling Characteristics of Coaches Used With Parents” centers on identifying clinician communication behaviors and missed opportunities during an eHealth intervention. Themes were identified within each category. Trends included greater use of close-ended questions over open-ended questions, frequent responses to parent emotions, and engagement in a shared process through providing information and exploring progress on parent goals. Missed opportunities occurred within each category. Coaches' communication behaviors demonstrated support for parent learning that was positively received. Joint planning to address parent challenges was a missed opportunity to support parent behavior changes regarding hearing-aid routines. The aim of “Listening and Spoken Language Specialist Auditory–Verbal Certification: Self-Perceived Benefits and Barriers to Inform Change” was to explore the professional's viewpoint on the path to the Listening and Spoken Language Specialist (LSLS) certification. There were 295 participants from different parts of the world: certified LSLSs, mentees pursuing certification, and professionals interested in certification. The study addressed motivation, self-perceived gains, challenges, and barriers in an international cohort. The purpose of the study was to guide future changes within the certification system. Several indicators pointed to the need for more awareness of significant gains LSLS certification can bring to professionals. There is also a need to address, minimize, and overcome perceived barriers in the process. Similarly, research is warranted to explore obtaining LSLS certification outside English-speaking countries and with a larger, more population-based sample. In the closing article, “Comfort Levels of Providers Serving Children Who are Deaf/Hard of Hearing: Discrepancies and Opportunities,” Blaiser and Mahshie discuss that while best practice outlines specific skills and expertise from highly qualified providers, in reality, many lack confidence related to hearing technology and resources related to serving children who are deaf/hard of hearing (DHH). The study surveyed 459 professionals in ASHA serving children who are DHH. The intent was to compare differences in confidence, training, and using resources between providers who have a self-selected interest in working with children who are DHH (membership in SIG 9) and those who serve children who are DHH and are not part of the hearing-related SIG. The results indicate that there is limited provider confidence in working with this population. These conclusions provide graduate training programs opportunities to explore provision of more intensive, comprehensive experience to better serve children who are DHH.
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